Why We Love Barcelona in November – Casamona

Why We Love Barcelona in November – Casamona

Barcelona’s Autumnal Charm

For many people who don’t live there, Barcelona may seem like a holiday destination exclusively meant for catching some rays in the months of July or August.  It almost seems like the city’s best kept secret that in the autumn months of October and November, when the crowds start to disappear and the weather turns to crisp blue skies and sun, Barcelona has even more to offer. Let us show you the best tops and reason why to visit Barcelona in November.

Beat the Crowds

Whether you’re moving to a new city or only staying for a few days on holiday, getting around can be stressful. One of the best things about Barcelona in the autumn is that the crowds of tourists and students filling the streets start to disappear, giving you space to really explore the hidden gems that you might have otherwise missed. Sadly, it is well known that Barcelona has problems with pickpockets, especially around the Ramblas area in the centre, but as the tourist wave starts to die down, you can feel safer than ever walking the streets, day or night.

Everyone knows that Barcelona’s weather is a main attraction for holiday-goers in the summer months, but no one should underestimate the fresh, autumn air that blows in as we go into November. With blue skies and lots of sun, the weather in Barcelona stays gorgeous throughout October, November and even December, with average temperatures hovering around 17 degrees celsius. The combination of fewer people and still-warm temperatures makes the beach much more pleasant than during the hot, overcrowded days of August. We highly recommend a refreshing morning swim!

Buzzing Barcelona

It’s a common misconception that summer destinations like Barcelona start to shut up shop as the months get colder, but there are still plenty of fantastic things to do and see all over the city. Of-course the Boqueria market on Las Ramblas is famous all over the world, but it is certainly not the only unmissable market in Barcelona. Palo Alto Market in Poble Nou is different, fun, and a great way to spend the weekend – especially as entry is only 3 euros! Palo Alto has countless stalls from local designers and artists, live music throughout the day and incredible food stalls of international cuisines, with chefs making fresh, mouth-watering food in front of your eyes.

Another top tip from us is that every sunday after 3pm, museums in Barcelona open their doors to the public completely free of charge. Although this happens all year round, it can be an arduous process queueing for hours with the hoards of summer travellers wanting to save a bit of cash, so go on a sunday and walk straight in – for free! If you’re looking for something to do in the colder, winter months, why not take a trip out of the city to one of the Pyrenées’ ski resorts? Masella and La Molina are the most well-known resorts, and while for advanced skiiers the pistes may not seem that challenging, they are still great places to spend a day out, especially for families.

 

 

Foodie Haven

Barcelona is renowned for its food and drink scene, but perhaps what is not so widely known is that as the chillier evenings roll in, most restaurants also roll out their cheapest prices and ‘menus del dia’. Walking around the city you’ll see countless menus written on blackboards outside restaurants which offer fantastic, homemade three-course meals, usually between 10 and 15 euros. This is also the time of year when stall sellers of hot roasted chestnuts and gooey sweet potatoes fill the street corners to really get you in the wintry Christmas spirit. In the day it is still warm enough to sit in a beautiful plaza and soak up the Spanish sun with a glass of sangria, but as the evenings close in there’s no better opportunity to cram into one of the tiny tapas bars in el Gotico or el Born and settle in with a glass of Vermouth and a pinxcho.

There are also numerous foodie day trips you can take from Barcelona that really make the most out of the season, such as visiting olive groves in the rural Catalonian mountains. This is a really special trip where you pick your own olives and take home the delicious, freshly pressed oil at the end of the day. You can also visit local cheese makers making artisan products unique to this area, and learn all about the process from the producers. Winery tours have always been popular in Spain, and there are lots of different companies that offer fantastic days filled with food, wine and Catalan tradition.

Cheaper Living

If you’re looking to live in Barcelona, there’s really no better time to do it. Exacerbated by the political situation in Catalonia, rental prices have fallen by more than 25% from this time in November last year (according to Tine Mathiassen, CEO of Casamona International), and are at their lowest in 5 years. It’s not only the cost of housing that has decreased, even restaurant prices are 7% lower than those in Madrid, for example. The cost of living is still substantially lower than elsewhere in Europe, according to the price index website Numbeo, rental prices in Paris are almost 50% higher than those in Barcelona, in London a whopping 130% higher, as well as 52% higher in Copenhagen. As you can see, Barcelona has a huge advantage over the other biggest and most popular cities in Europe. There’s never been a better time to rent or buy in Barcelona, apartments and houses are waiting to be snapped up – everyone should make the most of this opportunity.

If you want to know more activities to do in Barcelona check more info in our blogpost here

Written by Beatrice Hughes-Morgan